Начало US международных регулярных полетов.

russ_wood

russ_wood

Старожил
Kогда куда и кем был выполнен первый из USA международный полет по расписанию?
 
Реклама
svv

svv

Любопытный
Кepим Aбдyл Джaбир,
пассажирский или почтовый?
 
russ_wood

russ_wood

Старожил
svv,

без разницы какая была коммерческая загрузка главное самый первый по расписанию т.е. что было первее всего
 
svv

svv

Любопытный
1919 г. 3 марта почтовый рейс в Канаду
 
russ_wood

russ_wood

Старожил
svv,

пока холодно, очень холодно (Канада же все таки :) ) регулярный по расписанию имеется в виду, дата и направление тоже другие
 
Последнее редактирование:
russ_wood

russ_wood

Старожил
еще кто что нибудь может сказать по этому вопросу?
 
russ_wood

russ_wood

Старожил
на вывеске написано:

---

Место рождения PAN AMERICAN WORLD AIRWAYS .
Это здание было первым её оффисом.
28 Окт. 1927 Pan American рейс N01, вырулил на взлетную полосу в Кеу West
Направляясь на Гавану. Это было первым US международным авиасервисом по расписанию.

---

Key West крайний южный остров архипелага островов от Флориды США, находится в 90 милях от Кубы.
в свое время там жил Эрнест Хеменгуэй а в конце прошлого века туда массово плыли кубинские беженцы на всяких самодельных плавсредствах.
В настоящее время это очень популярное туристское место а так же местонахождение базы авиации ВМФ США.

PAN_AM_KW.jpg
 
Последнее редактирование:
svv

svv

Любопытный
Кepим Aбдyл Джaбир,
Кубу я конечно подозревал после маленькой подсказки, но то что это было в 1927 для меня полная неожиданность - думаю рейсы по расписанию начали раньше и это были почтовики. Нет данных по первому международному почтовому рейсу по расписанию?
 
Ученый

Ученый

Старожил
По данным ФАА на 1926 г. похоже:
http://www.faa.gov/about/media/b-chron.pdf
"1926
May 20, 1926: President Calvin Coolidge signed the Air Commerce Act of 1926 into law. The act instructed the Secretary of Commerce to foster air commerce; designate and establish airways; establish, operate, and maintain aids to air navigation (but not airports); arrange for research and development to improve such aids; license pilots; issue airworthiness certificates for aircraft and major aircraft components; and investigate accidents. (See Introduction.)
May 23, 1926: Western Air Express (WAE) became one of the first U.S. airlines to offer regular passenger service, flying from Los Angeles to Salt Lake City via Las Vegas. WAE had begun flying on Apr 17 as the fourth carrier to begin operations under a new air mail contract system that became the major source of income for the era's small but growing airline industry (see Jun 3, 1926).
Over twelve years earlier, the St. Petersburg-Tampa Airboat Line had offered the world's first regularly scheduled airline service using heavier-than-air craft. This enterprise lasted for only the first three months of 1914. On Mar 1, 1925, T. Claude Ryan's Los Angeles-San Diego Air Line had begun the first scheduled passenger service operated wholly over the U.S. mainland and throughout the year.
Jun 3, 1926: Amended legislation introduced a more workable method of paying airlines for carrying mail. The Air Mail Act of Feb 2, 1925, commonly known as the Kelly Act, had provided for transportation of mail on the basis of contracts between the Post Office Department and individual air carriers, a system that was to prove a great boon to America's fledgling airlines. Under the original Kelly Act, however, the carrier's compensation was computed as a percentage of the actual postage affixed to the mail carried. Since this computation proved cumbersome, the 1926 amendment substituted a procedure under which the airlines were paid by the pound for mail carried. (See May 17, 1928.)
Jun 11, 1926: The Ford Trimotor made its first flight. The famous "Tin Goose" was a high-wing monoplane with all-metal construction and a corrugated skin. The original 4-AT model seated eight passengers, later increased to twelve, and the improved 5-AT seated up to thirteen passengers. The Trimotor became a workhorse for U.S. airlines and remained in production until 1933.
Jul 2, 1926: A drop of tree seeds over a burned area in Hawaii on this date was the first recorded instance of reforesting by airplane.
Jul 3, 1926: A congressional joint resolution authorized the President to detail officers of the Army Air Corps to the Commerce Department to help in promoting civil aviation, provided the details did not exceed one year.
Jul 16, 1926: The Philadelphia Rapid Transit Company inaugurated the first daily passenger air service between Philadelphia and Washington, D.C., in connection with the celebration of the 150th anniversary of Declaration of Independence. Both passengers and mail were carried on a schedule of three trips in each direction daily, using three-engine Fokker monoplanes seating 10 passengers. The flying time was approximately 1 hour 30 minutes each way, and the passenger fare was $15 one way and $25 roundtrip. The service lasted for five months.
Aug 11, 1926: William P. MacCracken, Jr., took office as the first Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Aeronautics (see Oct 1, 1929). He thus became the first head of the Aeronautics Branch, created in the
Department of Commerce by Secretary Herbert Hoover to carry out the Secretary's responsibilities under the Air Commerce Act of 1926. MacCracken, who had assisted in drafting that act, brought to the position experience as a World War I Army pilot, as chairman of the American Bar Association's committee on aviation law, and as general counsel of National Air Transport, a contract mail carrier he helped organize in 1925.
With the appointment of MacCracken as its chief, the organization of the Aeronautics Branch proceeded rapidly. Secretary Hoover believed that the duties imposed by the Air Commerce Act should be carried out by existing Department of Commerce components. Although five principal units made up the Aeronautics Branch, which ranked as a bureau, only two were structurally part of the new Branch--the Air Regulations Division and the Air Information Division. The other three units followed directions from the Branch concerning work to be undertaken, but received detailed guidance and administrative support from other bureau-level components of the Department. Thus, the Airways Division was organized within the Bureau of Lighthouses, the Aeronautical Research Division within the Bureau of Standards, and the Air Mapping Section within the Coast and Geodetic Survey.
Oct 1, 1926: Northwest Airways began service as a contract mail carrier. The company began passenger service the following year, and expanded its routes in the late twenties and early thirties, changing its name to Northwest Airlines on Apr 16, 1934. Further expansion included routes to Asia, beginning in the 1940s, and for a time the carrier used the name Northwest Orient Airlines.
Nov 15, 1926: The Post Office invited bids from private operators to take over the transcontinental air mail route in two sections: San Francisco-Chicago and Chicago-New York. Although no satisfactory bids were received for the Chicago-New York route, the contract for the San Francisco-Chicago route went to the organizers of Boeing Air Transport on Jan 29, 1927. After new biding, the Post Office on Apr 3, 1927, announced the award of the Chicago-New York route to the newly formed National Air Transport. (See Aug 31, 1927.)
Nov 16, 1926: Dr. Louis Hopewell Bauer became the first Medical Director of the Aeronautics Branch. A major in the Medical Corps at the time of his appointment, Dr. Bauer had spent more than half of his 13-year Army career in the Air Service. (See Feb 28, 1927.)
Dec 7, 1926: The first airway light beacon erected by the Aeronautics Branch began operation. The beacon was located 15 miles northeast of Moline, Ill., on the Chicago-Dallas air mail route. By Jun 30, 1927, there were 4,121 miles of lighted airways, including 2,041 miles on the transcontinental airway that had been previously lighted by the Post Office Department. (See Apr 1973.)
Dec 7, 1926: The Aeronautics Branch made its first official airworthiness inspection of an American aircraft when Inspector Ralph Lockwood tested a Stinson Detroiter before its delivery to Canadian Air Express.
Dec 18, 1926: The first issue of Domestic Air News, the Aeronautics Branch official publication, appeared. (See Jul 1, 1929.)
Dec 31, 1926: The first Air Commerce Regulations of the Aeronautics Branch, Department of Commerce, became effective. Promulgated under provisions of the Air Commerce Act of 1926, these regulations resulted from many conferences between the Aeronautics Branch and pilots, operators, manufacturers, the Army, the Navy, and the Post Office Department.
The regulations required all aircraft engaged in interstate or foreign commerce to be licensed and marked with an assigned identification number. Pilots of licensed aircraft were required to hold private or commercial licenses. Commercial pilots were classed as either transport or industrial. Mechanics repairing aircraft engaged in air commerce were required to secure either engine or airplane mechanic licenses, or both. Owners, pilots, and mechanics affected had until Mar 1 (later extended to May 1), 1927, to place their applications on file. Pending action on these applications by the Aeronautics Branch, those applying by the specified date could continue operating as previously until Jul 1, 1927. Failure to apply as required was punishable by a $500 fine. The regulations also prescribed operational and air traffic safety rules. (See Mar 22, 1927.)"
 
russ_wood

russ_wood

Старожил
svv,

а это и был почтовый рейс, где то заметку даже нашел по этому поводу на днях где то была более подробная надо поискать:

http://www.centennialofflight.gov/essay/Commercial_Aviation/Pan_Am/Tran12.htm

On October 19, 1927, Pan Am flew its first flight by delivering mail from Key West, Florida, to Havana. Regularly scheduled service began nine days later.
первый рейс Pan American по доставке почты с Key West, Florida в Гавану 19 Окт. 1927 регулярные рейсы по расписанию начались девятью днями позднее.

---

Рейс выполнялся на гидросамолете: FC-2 Fairchild

Есть еще пару снимков с оствова выложу позднее
 
Реклама
russ_wood

russ_wood

Старожил
May 23, 1926: Western Air Express (WAE) became one of the first U.S. airlines to offer regular passenger service, flying from Los Angeles to Salt Lake City via Las Vegas. WAE had begun flying on Apr 17 as the fourth carrier to begin operations under a new air mail contract system that became the major source of income for the era's small but growing airline industry (see Jun 3, 1926).
да только это внутренний рейс, а мы говорим про рейсы из США и по расписанию
 
russ_wood

russ_wood

Старожил
Более крупным планом, в здании фунциклирует ресторан-пивнуха, музей отсутствует правда есть несколько памятных экспонатов по тематике ПанАм, потолочные вентиляторы выполнены в виде радиальных авиадвигателей, заведение с утра было закрыто а нам надо было уже в обратную дорогу так что в следующий раз :)

Pan_AM.jpg
 
russ_wood

russ_wood

Старожил
"90 миль до Кубы самая южная точка континентальных США"

KW_90MILES.jpg