Новости компании Boeing

alexfill2015

alexfill2015

Старожил
Коронавирус добивает символ американской технологической мощи
 
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A.F.

A.F.

take-off.ru
TwilightOil

TwilightOil

Старожил
а смысл то будет сертифицировать?
Ближайшие лет 5 смысла точно не будет - сначала пандемия пройдет, потом наладить производство в самом Боинге после пандемии, потом реанимировать Максы, только потом думать о Б-779, как о новом самом большом в мире 2-моторном
 
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Seerndv

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First F-15QA fighter flown for Qatar
First F-15QA fighter flown for Qatar
By Craig Hoyle14 April 2020
Boeing has conducted a 90min first flight with Qatar’s lead F-15QA fighter, describing the model as “the most advanced version” of the twin-engined type ever manufactured.
The Qatar Emiri Air Force will receive 36 F-15QAs from next year under a $6.2 billion contract awarded in 2017. Boeing also is to provide training for aircrew and maintenance personnel under a separate deal signed last year.
F-15QA

Source: Boeing
Lead F-15QA is part of a 36-aircraft procurement
Conducted from Lambert International airport in St. Louis, Missouri, the debut sortie included a vertical “Viking” take-off and handling manoeuvres including 9g turns.
“Checks of systems such as avionics and radar were also successful”, Boeing says, noting that the fighter “performed as planned”.
“This successful first flight is an important milestone that brings our squadrons one step closer to flying this incredible aircraft over the skies of Qatar,” says Colonel Ahmed Al Mansoori, commander of the Gulf nation’s F-15 Wing.
Pointing to the Qatari model’s claimed “best-in-class range and payload”, Boeing F-15 programme manager Prat Kumar says: “The advanced F-15QA not only offers game changing capabilities, but is also built using advanced processes which make the jet more efficient to manufacture.”
Boeing says this process has supported its development of an F-15EX variant being offered to the US Air Force. The service could acquire up to 144 of the type as replacements for aged C/D-model fighters, with an initial procurement expected to be for eight examples.
 
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Pit

Pit

Старожил
В оригинале - Боинг передал заказчику последний коммерческий 737NG. Вот вроде мелочь, а как меняется смысл. Изъятием одного слова из перевода Посейдон сняли с серийного (!) производства...
 
A

A_Z

Старожил
Бурундук, в показатели входят не только новые, но и модернизируемые ЛА. И если для "Апача" и "Чинука" данные разделены на две строки, то для С-17 такое деление смысла не имеет - там новых машин нет. А модернизировать С-17 могли для индусов. Вроде бы, последнюю машину они как раз в прошлом году получили. Причём именно в августе.
 
Siledka

Siledka

Гриб
Именно так. India Takes Delivery of 11th C-17 Globemaster From United States
Видимо самолет из наличия ВВС США.
Емнип - у боинга был задел, с десяток нераспроданных бортов с-17 к моменту окончания производства. Их понемногу и распихивали. Американские серийные у всех будут, кто шёл через программы военного сотрудничества, это не значит, что из наличия
 
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Seerndv

Старожил
CMV-22 Ferry Flight Demonstrates Successful Fusion of Developmental, Operational Test


CMV-22 Ferry Flight Demonstrates Successful Fusion of Developmental, Operational Test
(Source: US Naval Air Systems Command; issued April 10, 2020)

PATUXENT RIVER, Md. --- The recent cross-country flight of the Navy’s new CMV-22B Carrier Onboard Delivery (COD) variant of the Osprey tilt-rotor aircraft was not only a milestone for the program, but also proved to be a perfect opportunity to demonstrate the effective fusion of development and operational test in a real-world environment.

Over a two-day flight totaling just over 6.5 hours in the air, pilots LCDR Steve “Sanchez” Tschanz of Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (HX) 21 “Blackjacks” and CDR Kristopher “Junk” Carter of Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (VX) 1 “Pioneers” and crew chief Naval Aircrewman (Mechanical) 1st Class Devon Heard flew the first CMV-22B from the Bell Military Aircraft Assembly & Delivery Center in Amarillo, Texas, to Naval Air Station Patuxent River in early February. It was the first flight of the aircraft outside of the manufacturer’s test area, and it mirrored many of the conditions that the aircraft will encounter when operational.

“It was a great opportunity for operational and developmental testers to work together on the same flight,” said Tschanz.

Carter agreed with Tschanz’ assessment. “The biggest litmus test I have when we start out on operational tests is to find a mission that is representative of what we're going to do with the aircraft once it is in the fleet,” Carter said. “With this flight, we got an early look at operational testing while we're also doing developmental tests.”

“From a crew chief's perspective, on this trip I was able to see both the developmental test side and the operational side integrated in one,” said Heard, who was a Naval Aircrewman (Mechanical) 2nd Class at the time of the flight and has since been promoted. “As a developmental test crew chief, I was involved in testing the software, loading and strapping down cargo, and things like that. And then having the chance to get our feet wet on the operational side, to see how we are going to use what the CMV-22 provides for logistical purposes on the ferry flight, was really important.”

The role of developmental testing, which is the mission of HX-21, is to identify whether an aircraft or system meets the promised specifications. Operational testing, which is what VX-1 does, focuses on the ability of an aircraft or system to operate in the environments that it will encounter once it is deployed to the fleet. Prior to the flight, Tschanz, Heard, Bell test pilot Andrew Bankston, and Naval Air Crewman (Mechanical) 2nd Class Trenton Olsheski conducted a series of developmental test flights to ensure the aircraft met its specifications. Following those test flights, it was time to deliver the aircraft to its new home at NAS Patuxent River.

Or, more accurately, almost time – the crew ended up waiting nearly a week for a hole in the weather to open up between Texas and Maryland. Because the aircraft was fitted with extensive test equipment, the flight was limited to clear weather and daylight hours, which narrowed their options.

On Saturday, Feb. 1, the weather finally cooperated and Tschanz, Carter and Heard decided to fly first to Millington, Tennessee, for a refueling stop before continuing on to Patuxent River. Having flown together before, the three men quickly fell into a routine: while Tschanz was flying the aircraft, for example, Carter would be busy monitoring communications and Heard kept his eye on the weather.

The Osprey’s high-visibility paint scheme, which the Navy uses to help make it easier to identify noncombatant aircraft – and which, Tschanz joked, was more flattering than the usual matte blue-gray paint on the aircraft’s bulkier profile – certainly was part of the attraction when the aircraft landed in Millington, where the Naval Support Activity Mid-South base is located.

“There’s usually a certain amount of interest when a unique aircraft flies into any airport where that type normally doesn’t operate,” Tschanz said. “But in this case it was even more fun because we landed and people said, ‘Oh, that's a V-22,’ and then immediately you can see the gears start turning in their heads as they start to realize that something is different about it.”

After lunch and a refueling at Millington, the crew departed in the afternoon, expecting to arrive at NAS Patuxent River in the late afternoon. But approximately nine-tenths of the way home, the weather started closing in over their destination, and the crew elected to divert to Lynchburg, Virginia to wait out the rain overnight. And once again, like in Millington, Tschanz, Carter, and Heard found themselves instant celebrities as pilots and aviation enthusiasts descended on them to ask questions about their unique Osprey.

The following morning, Tschanz, Carter, and Heard flew through clear skies to land at NAS Patuxent River to the welcome of their families and squadron mates, bringing to a successful close the aircraft’s first cross-country flight.

“We have a lot of tests to do before we know everything about the airplane, but this initial look was great,” Carter said of the flight.

“There was a lot of excitement, eagerness, and anxiousness to be able to fly the first CMV-22B back to HX-21,” Heard said. “Now we own it and we're ready to move forward.”

The CMV-22B is designed to carry up to 6,000 pounds of cargo and/or personnel and operate up to a range of 1,150 nautical miles. One of the reasons the Navy selected the V-22 airframe to serve in the COD role is because of its ability to carry the Pratt & Whitney F135 engine power module used by the F-35C Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter.

Other features of the CMV-22 include a beyond-line-of-sight, high-frequency radio system, and internal public-address system to communicate with passengers, and an improved lighting system to assist with cargo loading.

The Navy’s program of record is to acquire 48 aircraft across all VRM squadrons to serve as replacements for the venerable C-2A Greyhound, which has been fulfilling the COD role since 1966. Fleet Logistics Multi-Mission Squadron (VRM) 30 “Titans,” based on the West Coast of the United States, will take possession of its first CMV-22B this summer, and is scheduled to field the Ospreys on its first operational detachment aboard the USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70) later next year.

A new squadron, Fleet Logistics Multi-Mission Squadron (VRM) 40, will be established on the East Coast, will take possession of its aircraft beginning in FY2022. The Navy also plans to stand up a training squadron, Fleet Logistics Multi-Mission Squadron (VRM) 50, in California adjacent to VRM-30.
- просто напоминание:

US Navy receives first CMV-22B Osprey aircraft from Bell Boeing
US Navy receives first CMV-22B Osprey aircraft
By Srivani Venna

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CMV-22B

The CMV-22B is capable of carrying up to 6,000lb and can cover more than 1,150nm. Credit: Bell Textron Inc.
The US Navy has taken delivery of the first CMV-22B Osprey aircraft, the latest variant that brings proven tiltrotor capabilities, from Bell Textron and Boeing.
The Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey is set to replace the C-2A Greyhound fleet for the US Navy’s carrier on-board delivery mission of transporting personnel and cargo from shore bases to aircraft carriers at sea.
Capable of carrying up to 6,000lb, the CMV-22B can cover more than 1,150nm and can land on the flight deck of an aircraft carrier.

It features the F-35C engine power module secured inside its fuselage and provides roll-on/roll-off delivery.
The CMV-22B aircraft can also provide improved logistical capability worldwide due to expanded sponsons that increase fuel capacity.
Bell V-22 vice-president and Bell Boeing deputy programme director Chris Gehler said: “This CMV-22 first delivery marks a new milestone with our US Navy customer providing unmatched versatility in an aviation platform.
“Bell Boeing, our dedicated employees, and Team Osprey are proud to support our US government customer in bringing this unique capability to the fleet.”
 
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